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Ethiopia used chemicals to kill locusts. Billions of honeybees disappeared

April 30, 2023

Article published by Terna Gyuse

 

 

1 Comment

  1. This brought early childhood memories when a swarm of locusts invaded our neck of wood in Western Hararghe along the old railway line all the way to the banks of the Awash River. It used to descend upon us once in a decade or two. It used to bring a windfall business to us kids. I remember running around a small sheet of close to catch as many locusts as I could. The more we caught the more rewarding business it was for the unassuming kids. Once I had what I considered a good catch then it was a dash to the local Yemeni shop owners. There was no commodity exchange that fixed the price for us. But it was up to the discretion of the shop owner. No money though. It was all for that candy with sweet jelly in it or a palm full of sugar. Those Yemenis had a recipe that they brought all the way from their country. But to the farmers it was not fun at all. It spelled calamity. I remember the entire town going into the surrounding areas trying to chase away the swarm. I still vividly recall seeing them running in and around the farms with whips and smoke to stop the locusts from landing. It was the only traditional way they knew at that time and it was somehow 50% effective. Locust was their worst nightmare.

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