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Ethiopia faces up to child labor crisis

June 12 marks World Day Against Child Labor but millions of youngsters are still being exploited
June 12 marks World Day Against Child Labor but millions of youngsters are still being exploited

Eleven-year-old Andualem, one of Ethiopia’s estimated 5.5 million underage workers, does not know that Sunday is World Day Against Child Labor.
Andualem works as welder at an auto-repair shop located in the heart of the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. His workplace is also his home.
“I worked as a carwash boy since I was seven. Then I managed to learn welding,” he tells Anadolu Agency.
“Welding is hard work; it’s particularly harmful to the eyes. I live in the garage where I work because the $1-2 a day income is not enough to cover the cost for food and shelter.”
“My parents live in rural parts of the country and I have never been to school. I came to Addis Ababa at the age of seven.”
Another child, Mestawet, sells roasted cereals on the streets.
She says: “My father is a carpenter and my mother is a daily laborer – sometimes they work and sometimes they do not. Therefore, I have to sell the roasted cereals to fulfill our needs.”
“Some people harass me; however, I never stop working” the seven-year-old adds.
According to a survey conducted in five selected regions by the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, over 16,500 children work in traditional weaving or are involved in farming.
Just over half of these children say they work to support their families but the majority – 73.4 percent – do not go to school.
Ethiopia’s Central Statistical Agency says out of the country’s total child population of 22 million, more than 5.5 million are laborers between the ages of five and 14. Most of the children work in the informal economy.
According to the ministry, the children are often employed for low wages in 12-hour shifts. Some work on coffee and tea farms. Others in urban dry-waste collection or in small manufacturing shops.
Forty-eight-year-old Agaredech has two children working for traditional weavers.
“What can we do? We are poor and they have to labor for us and themselves,” she says. “I know how it is hard for them; we expect divine intervention.”
Ethiopia, the second most populous country in Sub-Saharan Africa, has a population of 97 million of which almost 30 percent live on less than $0.6 per day, according to the World Bank.

According to the labor ministry, Ethiopia’s economy, which has a 10.9 percent growth rate, has helped families feed and send their children to school.
 
Source: World Bulletin

4 Comments

  1. Double digit woy-ane growth attained by the poor children’s blood and sweat but what is not clear is, the High Definition Prime Minster Desalegne earns 400 dollars a month and wears an Armani or high end suits costing more than $400 just like his groomer the Midget Melles Chenawi/zenawi has a lot of them, how did he manage to save and have a dozen of them while the poor children are living in abject poverty!!

  2. Double digit woy-ane growth attained by the poor children’s blood and sweat but what is not clear is, the High Definition Prime Minster Desalegne earns 400 dollars a month and wears an Armani or high end suits costing more than $400 just like his groomer the Midget Melles Chenawi/zenawi has a lot of them, how did he manage to save and have a dozen of them while the poor children are living in abject poverty!!

  3. Food safety, zoonotic diseases (transmissible between people and animals) emerging diseases, and diseases associated with agricultural intensification.is major focus of Oromia Pastoralist Association (OPA) research is approaches to food safety and disease control that can work in informal markets and marginal areas. This program combines risk analysis, epidemiology, socio-economics and gender analysis to identify, test and adapt appropriate options for food safety assurance and control of zoonotic diseases within the context of developing countries.
    Animal Science for Sustainable Productivity (ASSP) is a global program working to increase the productivity of livestock systems in developing countries through high-quality animal science (breeding, nutrition and animal health) and livestock systems research. The program aims to increase the supply and quality of animal feed from forage and crop residues, developing animal breeding strategies that are suitable for small scale farmers and identification and control of diseases that impair animal health. It also tests how new approaches to increasing animal productivity can be implemented in different livestock and farming systems.
    The program has been created to bring together ILRI teams working on animal feeding, animal breeding, animal health and livestock systems. This integration will allow a more unified approach to bringing applied animal sciences to bear on the challenge of sustainably increasing livestock productivity. Within the context of livestock systems, it is rarely possible to isolate the different aspects of animal science. For example, introduction of more productive genotypes usually requires better feeding and animal health care. On the other hand improvement in feed availability opens up opportunities for smallholders to keep more productive breeds.
    The program objective is to provide high quality, relevant research that is able to guide research and development initiatives aimed at improving the livelihoods of women and men operating in livestock value chains. Working with other programs, LGI works toward identifying promising technological, organizational and institutional innovations; assessing their likely impact on women and men; building strong partnerships with other research institutes, the private sector and government agencies (including line ministries and local government authorities), and to test interventions in order to assess their impact and potential for scaling.
    Program activities are directly aligned with one of the four components of the .Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health, namely, prevention and control of agriculture-associated diseases. It also contributes to the value chain work of the . Research Program on Livestock and Fish.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTV5rmNOZwE

  4. Food safety, zoonotic diseases (transmissible between people and animals) emerging diseases, and diseases associated with agricultural intensification.is major focus of Oromia Pastoralist Association (OPA) research is approaches to food safety and disease control that can work in informal markets and marginal areas. This program combines risk analysis, epidemiology, socio-economics and gender analysis to identify, test and adapt appropriate options for food safety assurance and control of zoonotic diseases within the context of developing countries.
    Animal Science for Sustainable Productivity (ASSP) is a global program working to increase the productivity of livestock systems in developing countries through high-quality animal science (breeding, nutrition and animal health) and livestock systems research. The program aims to increase the supply and quality of animal feed from forage and crop residues, developing animal breeding strategies that are suitable for small scale farmers and identification and control of diseases that impair animal health. It also tests how new approaches to increasing animal productivity can be implemented in different livestock and farming systems.
    The program has been created to bring together ILRI teams working on animal feeding, animal breeding, animal health and livestock systems. This integration will allow a more unified approach to bringing applied animal sciences to bear on the challenge of sustainably increasing livestock productivity. Within the context of livestock systems, it is rarely possible to isolate the different aspects of animal science. For example, introduction of more productive genotypes usually requires better feeding and animal health care. On the other hand improvement in feed availability opens up opportunities for smallholders to keep more productive breeds.
    The program objective is to provide high quality, relevant research that is able to guide research and development initiatives aimed at improving the livelihoods of women and men operating in livestock value chains. Working with other programs, LGI works toward identifying promising technological, organizational and institutional innovations; assessing their likely impact on women and men; building strong partnerships with other research institutes, the private sector and government agencies (including line ministries and local government authorities), and to test interventions in order to assess their impact and potential for scaling.
    Program activities are directly aligned with one of the four components of the .Research Program on Agriculture for Nutrition and Health, namely, prevention and control of agriculture-associated diseases. It also contributes to the value chain work of the . Research Program on Livestock and Fish.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTV5rmNOZwE

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